Pumpkin Scones with Pumpkin Spice Icing

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Sunday morning I took these pumpkin scones to our marriage class.  My kids were not very happy with me.  You see, I let them taste them the night before.  They were most distressed to learn that was the only one they were getting.

I’m going to have to make these again real soon to bring peace back to my household.

I am not a big fan of hard scones.  I like ones that have more of a softer give.  More cake-like.  These fit the bill perfectly, and if you love the flavors of pumpkin pie?



You’re going to love these.

First for your dry ingredients. Dump the following into a mixing bowl. 2 cups of flour, 1/3 cup brown sugar, and 2 teaspoons baking powder.

Also add 1/2 teaspoon of the following:
Cloves,Cinnamon, Ground Ginger, Nutmeg,  and Salt




Mix up the dry ingredients real good with a whisk.

Now take 1/2 stick of very cold or frozen butter.  Sigh…of course I’m doubling this, so pay no attention to my incorrect pictures, as usual.  HEY! Adults eat a LOT of scones on Sunday morning!

Cut your butter  into thin slices.


butter

With a pastry cutter or 2 sharp knives, begin to cut your butter into the dry mixture.  Do not let a pastry cutter intimidate you.  It’s actually quite therapeutic.


cutbutter

You should start to see your butter and flour mixture begin to form little chunks about the size of peas.

Grab a new medium-size bowl.  Scoop in  1/2 cup of canned pumpkin.  To this add 1/2 cup of heavy cream.  Whisk them smoothly together.


Wetcollage

Now crack one egg into a bowl. Whisk it with a fork.  Mix it into your pumpkin/cream mixture.


eggcollage

Now you’re going to take your pumpkin mixture or wet ingredients and add them slowly, a little at a time into your dry mixture.  Not too much! Just until everything is mixed thoroughly.  I used my dough hook, but this dough is wet enough, you could probably use your paddle as well.


mixdrywet

When you’re done, you’ll have a pretty stick wet dough so I’d recommend spraying your hands with baking spray to handle it.

There are a couple different ways to cut scones.  Either way you use, place  your shaped dough form into the freezer for about 15 minutes to ensure even cutting and firming the butter back to its coldest form.

First, the round method.  Plop your dough onto a lined baking sheet or pizza stone that’s been sprayed.  Mound the center higher than the outsides edges of the dough.


round

After chilling for 15 minutes, cut with a pizza cutter into 8 wedges.  You can make them thinner if you like.


circlecutpieces

Or you can make a rectangular shape on a regular baking sheet.  I would aim for 3 inches wide unless you want really large scones.


rectangle

Take your pizza cutter and cut lines across the width of the dough.  Then cut those squares in half diagonally.


cutrectangle

I tried both and really favored the rectangular piece for ease of cutting, but liked the shapes of the wedges from the round one better. Next time I would make the rectangular piece longer and thinner as the pieces were humongous.

Whichever way you choose, make sure you lift your pieces with a spatula and pull them apart so all the pieces can bake around all sides.


piecescollage

Put your pan into your oven on the center rack and bake for 15 minutes.  They should be just starting to brown and when you stick a fork or toothpick into the  the center of the largest one , it should come out  clean and not wet at all.

Remove from the oven to cool.

While they’re baking, make your frosting.

Sift a cup of powdered sugar into a bowl.

sift

Add 1 tablespoon of your canned pumpkin.

Add 1/4 teaspoon of each:

cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, ground ginger


frostingdry

I probably should have cleaned up that bowl before I took a picture, but we like to keep it real here in Reality Kitchen and those sifter thingies are hard to tame.

Begin to drizzle some more of your heavy cream into the powdered sugar mixture.  Whisk all the ingredients together until very smooth.  You’re looking for the consistency of molasses here.

frostingcream

Now, for those of you without a sweet tooth, you will be absolutely satisfied with a warm scone and a cup of tea.

nofrosting

But for those of you who want a little bit more…shall we say…SPECIAL?

Pour yourself a warm mug of cider or coffee and spread on the spiced frosting.


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Lord have mercy…

Katie’s Printable Recipe- Pumpkin Scones with Pumpkin Spice Icing

Cooking with Love,

~Katie
Pumpkin on Foodista
Pumpkin Scones on Foodista

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Aunt Jane’s Quiche | Dishin & Dishes

Aunt Jane's Quiche | Dishin & Dishes

Every fourth Sunday, Mr. Wonderful and I make breakfast for our church worship team.  They do four services a day which puts them at church sometimes from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. and until four of us signed up to cook for them they had a box of donuts.

Now don’t get me wrong, on any given day, a box of donuts is a grand thing,  but it probably doesn’t provide a whole lot of sustenance.  And besides, Mr. Wonderful made homemade cinnamon rolls, so they were covered in the area of sweets.

Sunday I wanted to make quiche, and the best quiche recipe I could think of was my Aunt Jane’s quiche.



This is my Aunt Jane.






I have such fond memories of weekends at my aunt’s house with my cousins Laurie, Karen and Diane and my poor brother Steve (the only boy in the group).  Their house backed up to the woods on one side and an elementary school on the other which meant that we had a playground to play on.  The trails through the woods gave us young adventurers a mysterious place to explore but the greatest fun was for my Uncle Duane to pull us on a toboggan on his snowmobile through the the dark woods at night with only the light of the snowmobile to guide us.

I remember falling off the snow-mobile and my cousins and I clinging together in the dark woods until he realized we were gone and came back after us.  All great fun for young kids bundled up in puffy snowsuits in the winter.  No one here in Oklahoma knows what great fun snowmobiles can be.  I don’t even think you can buy one here.

Aunt Jane also used to make wonderful and delicious food.  Breakfast offered things like pancakes, and thick-sliced bacon.  Aunt Jane always put out little bowls of things like chocolate chips, pecans and powdered sugar to sprinkle over the pancakes, and as a young child, I was in heaven!

She will always be special in my heart and has been such a wonderful aunt to me (and great-aunt to my kids).

I love her dearly.

She is currently at home recovering from a hip replacement surgery.  I know she would love to read some comments from you all so if you could say “hi” and give her a “get well soon” I know she would get a kick out of it!  And if you make this recipe, come back and leave a comment thanking my Aunt Jane.

Here is her quiche recipe and believe me, you will come to adore it like I have.  Remove the peppers and onions for a basic bacon, egg and cheese quiche for picky eaters or add your own variation like fresh spinach or asparagus for seasonal options!

Start by cooking up 8 slices of bacon.  Make them like this which is my new favorite way!

Then for the crust – it’s a simple two-ingredient crust and may be a little unconventional, but, trust me, it’s delicious!

I made my quiche in a deep-dish pie stone, but if you are using shallow pie dishes or pans, no worries! I have included a printable at the end for either/or version!

Take one sleeve plus 6 saltine crackers and put them in your food processor.






Put the lid on and whiz them up for a minute until they form fine crumbs.  No food processor? Just put them in a baggie and roll them with a rolling pin.






In a medium saucepan, over medium-low heat, melt a stick of butter.  Be careful not to let it brown but just to melt.






Dump your cracker crumbs in the pot and mix them up really well.






Then press them firmly with a large spoon or rubber spatula up the sides and across the bottom of your pie pan.






Next, grate up 2 1/2 cups of Swiss cheese.  I can rarely ever find pre-grated Swiss cheese so I just buy a block and use the shredding blade of my food processor.  A box grater would work also!






Crack 4 eggs into a bowl and beat them up and then pour in 2 1/4 cups of half and half.






Dump in your cheese.






Chop up your bacon.






And add in right in.






Seriously, how could you wrong with eggs, bacon, cheese and half and half?  It’s such a winning combination.

Chop up two tablespoons of red pepper and red onion.  Add them into the mixture with one teaspoon of salt and one-half teaspoon of pepper and also a one-half teaspoon of paprika.






And mix it all up with fervor.






And pour it right into your crust.






Then take your spatula and kind of even things out in the dish.






Then pop your quiche into a 350 oven for 30-40 minutes for a deep-dish quiche or 20-30 for a shallow-dish one.

I made one plain bacon, egg and cheese quiche and one with peppers and onions for the worship team.  Mr. Wonderful was roasting some oven potatoes for them so it actually took mine almost 50 minutes to finish with all of that in the oven.






And remember, oven temperatures will vary, so check it after the least  amount of time by sticking a fork in the center of the quiche.  The center shouldn’t jiggle and the fork should come out clean when it’s done.

The top should be golden and browned and the whole thing will just look beautiful.






Try this quiche for your next breakfast or brunch.  It’ll become a favorite around your house like it is mine.

Thanks Aunt Jane for this fabulous recipe.   And thanks for the memories as well! I wish you a speedy recovery and hope someone makes you this quiche!






Because it’s so delicious!  If you make this, come back and leave a comment thanking my Aunt Jane.  I know after tasting this again this week, I could just kiss her!

Aunt Jane’s Quiche – Deep Dish Pie Dish

 

Author:

Recipe type: Breakfast

  • 2 c. crushed saltine crackers (1 sleeve plus 6 crackers)
  • 7 T. melted butter
  • 8-10 slices bacon
  • 2 T. chopped red onion
  • 2 T. chopped red pepper
  • 2¼ c. half-and-half
  • 4 eggs, beaten
  • ½ t. salt
  • ½ t. paprika
  • 2½ c. grated swiss cheese (8 oz)
  1. Preheat oven to 350º
  2. in food processor, whiz crackers until fine crumbs are formed (or place in gallon Ziploc baggie and use rolling pin to crush).
  3. In medium saucepan, melt butter over medium heat, remove from heat and stir cracker crumbs. Spread cracker crumbs in bottom and sides of pie pan to form crust, pressing firmly.
  4. Chop bacon slices into ½ pieces and cook over medium heat until bacon is crisp. Drain on paper towels to absorb grease.
  5. Combine other ingredients in large mixing bowl and pour into crust.
  6. Use spoon or spatula to evenly push around cheese and other fillings.
  7. Bake for 30-40 minutes or until fork inserted in center of quiche comes out clean without any eggs sticking to it.

3.3.3070

 

 

Aunt Jane’s Quiche – Shallow Pie Dish

 

Author:

Recipe type: Breakfast

  • 1¼ c. crushed saltine crackers (1 sleeve)
  • 6 T. melted butter
  • 6 slices bacon
  • 1 T. chopped red onion
  • 1 T. chopped red pepper
  • 1½ c. half-and-half
  • 3 eggs, beaten
  • ½ t. salt
  • ½ t. paprika
  • 2 c. grated swiss cheese (8 oz)
  1. Preheat oven to 350º
  2. in food processor, whiz crackers until fine crumbs are formed (or place in gallon Ziploc baggie and use rolling pin to crush).
  3. In medium saucepan, melt butter over medium heat, remove from heat and stir cracker crumbs. Spread cracker crumbs in bottom and sides of pie pan to form crust, pressing firmly.
  4. Chop bacon slices into ½ pieces and cook over medium heat until bacon is crisp. Drain on paper towels to absorb grease.
  5. Combine other ingredients in large mixing bowl and pour into crust.
  6. Use spoon or spatula to evenly push around cheese and other fillings.
  7. Bake for 25 minutes or until fork inserted in center of quiche comes out clean without any eggs sticking to it.

3.3.3070

Want to watch me make this on my TV segment? Click Play below!

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